Authors

Podcast

Categories

Carbonomics

Older Archives

What’s so Great about Fixed Charges?

December 14th, 2014 by Severin Borenstein, Haas Business School, UC Berkekey

There’s a lot of talk in California these days about imposing fixed monthly charges on residential electricity bills. The large investor-owned utilities in California have small or no fixed charges,instead collecting all of their revenue from households through usage-based charges, called volumetric pricing.

Continue reading »

A new Energy Policy for the new European Commission?

December 4th, 2014 by Jean-Michel Glachant, European University Institute

No EU policy can be perfect – it will inevitably be a compromise between a good cause and a due cause. However, we are now at a critical turning point, as several pillars of former Barroso’s EU energy policy have already collapsed, prompting an update or an entire overhaul.

Continue reading »

Power Struggles: The Intra-Community Implications of EU Energy Policy

November 30th, 2014 by Daniel Scholten, Delft University of Technology

EU policies to integrate energy markets, promote renewable energy, and diversify supply are aiming at a competitive and sustainable European power sector. The resulting dynamics should largely affect the systems of electricity generation, transportation and storage in Europe: With increasing market integration come new new competitors; coal and gas power plants face new renewable challengers domestically and abroad; and diversification towards new suppliers will bring new trade routes and infrastructure. All in all, EU policies to integrate power markets, promote renewables, and diversify supply will thus profoundly reshuffle national energy assets. The impact of the three EU policies is thus likely to have considerable ‘geopolitical’ implications for individual member states and affect their capability to negotiate, agree on, and/or implement further measures. We conduct a thought experiment which explores potential benefits and losses for individual member states implicit to Europe’s ‘energy transition’, and the political concerns which may be expected to arise as a consequence. Continue reading »

Nord Stream and German-Russian energy relations during the Ukraine crisis

November 16th, 2014 by Marco Siddi, University of Edinburgh

Eight years ago, shortly after German and Russian leaders agreed on the construction of Nord Stream, then Polish defence minister Radoslaw Sikorski called it “the Molotov-Ribbentrop pipeline”. Sikorski compared the project to the 1939 pact between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union, which partitioned East-Central Europe. Nord Stream, he argued, would allow Germany to secure its gas imports from Russia while Moscow simultaneously turned off the tap and blackmailed governments in East-Central Europe. However, contrary to Sikorski’s predictions, during the current crisis in Ukraine the pipeline has allowed Germany to take a tougher stance towards Russia than most EU member states. Continue reading »

Coordination Mechanisms for Accommodating Increasing Amounts of Wind and Solar in the Power Market

November 4th, 2014 by Jacques de Jong, Clingendael International Energy Programme

European power markets are being confronted with an unprecedented transition process toward a low-carbon power system. The speed and complexity of this shift are raising serious challenges and operational difficulties. The successful increase in the deployment of variable renewable electricity technologies is bringing the EU objective of raising the share of these technologies in its energy mix to 20% by 2020 closer to an attainable reality. But there are deep concerns about the continuing impacts of this transition, especially as it is further expanded to include a substantially larger share of renewables by 2050.

Continue reading »

Energy Justice

October 28th, 2014 by Raphael Heffron, University of Leeds

In essence, effective and efficient energy law and policy will balance energy economics, energy security and climate change mitigation to deliver the best outcome to society. However, if one examines energy law and policy in more detail often it is just one of these points that dominates the energy agenda; more often than not it is economics.
Continue reading »

Seamless power markets

October 22nd, 2014 by Manuel Baritaud, Senor Analyst at the IEA

In order to better integrate their electricity markets, regions must first have confidence that when push comes to shove during times of capacity scarcity, their neighbours will continue work with them, and not against them. That means paying more attention to the rules for security of electricity supply. If you can’t count on your neighbours in times of need, you want to make sure that you have enough steel on the ground in your own jurisdiction. But with this kind of mindset, markets can’t just function properly.

Continue reading »

Remember back when everybody hated electricity deregulation?

October 8th, 2014 by James Bushnell, University of California at Davies

A brief post concerning electricity restructuring that looks back over the last 20 years. Around that time I started giving a talk titled “If electricity restructuring is so great, why does everybody hate it?” Back then, several states like Illinois and Maryland were actively pursuing options to “re-regulate” markets that they had at least partially restructured.
Continue reading »

The main challenges to achieve an integrated European smart-grid

September 19th, 2014 by Tamar Gomez, Research assistant, IFP School

The EU commission faces several challenges in order to convert a budding yet timely effort in smart grid research into a full grown market with its infrastructures and set of rules They are are of different nature: regulatory, economic and social.
Continue reading »

Paying for kWh, kW or km?

September 8th, 2014 by Claude Crampes, Toulouse School of Economics

Traditionally, the distribution charge paid by consumers of electricity connected to a grid is based on the capacity for which they subscribe and the number of kWh withdrawn during a given period. Energy consumption is however actually a poor approximation of the willingness to pay for being connected. Additionally, except for thermal losses, the cost incurred by distribution system operators (DSO) does not depend on the quantity transported. The main raison d’être of the kWh index is that it is indispensable for producers and suppliers. Since it is an existing gauge provided by installed meters, why not use it for distribution? Continue reading »